March 22-24, 2024 | Multitumor CME/MOC, ACPE and NCPD Symposium | Miami, Florida

Third Annual National General Medical Oncology Summit

A Multitumor CME/MOC-, ACPE- and NCPD-Accredited Educational Conference Developed in Partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute

Dates
March 22-24, 2024

Location
JW Marriott Miami Turnberry
19999 West Country Club Drive
Aventura, Florida
Hotel Phone: (305) 932-6200

Meeting Room
King Ballroom (Conference Level)

This event will also be webcast live.
Please see Registration tab for details.


Room Reservations
A special discounted room rate of $399 (plus applicable tax and resort fee) is available to conference attendees at JW Marriott Miami Turnberry. Please see the Location tab for details.


Note from the Moderator

This March will mark the return of our annual National General Medical Oncology Summit. I am also pleased to announce that we will be partnering with Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute for this one-of-a-kind offering that will span 3 days and feature a stellar multidisciplinary faculty panel of clinical investigators and a unique blend of short didactic presentations, lively moderated panel discussions and dedicated Q&A sessions. The conference’s educational design and the topics that will be discussed offer interested clinicians access to the in-depth perspectives of some of the top minds in the field regarding significant new data sets, promising treatment strategies and key interdisciplinary management considerations in the care of patients with cancer. We hope you will join us in sunny South Florida for a learning experience unlike any other out there.



FACULTY

Keynote Session: ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer
Erika Hamilton, MD
Director, Breast Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Nashville, Tennessee

Kevin Kalinsky, MD, MS
Professor
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology
Emory University School of Medicine
Director, Glenn Family Breast Center
Director, Breast Medical Oncology
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Joyce O’Shaughnessy, MD
Celebrating Women Chair in Breast Cancer Research
Baylor University Medical Center
Chair, Breast Disease Committee
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Dallas, Texas

Hope S Rugo, MD
Professor of Medicine
Winterhof Family Professor of Breast Cancer
Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education
Medical Director, Cancer Infusion Services
University of California, San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
San Francisco, California


Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Ann S LaCasce, MD, MMSc
Director, Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Lymphoma Program
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

Matthew Lunning, DO
Associate Professor of Medicine
Medical Director, Cellular Therapy
Associate Vice Chair of Research
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Clinical Research
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Department of Internal Medicine
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, Nebraska

Kami Maddocks, MD
Professor — Clinical
Director, Lymphoma Program
Associate Division Director
for Ambulatory Operations
Division of Hematology
Medical Director, Infusion Services
Associate Chief Medical Officer
Chief of Staff Elect
The James Cancer Hospital
and Solove Research Institute
The Ohio State University
Comprehensive Cancer Center
Columbus, Ohio

Andrew D Zelenetz, MD, PhD
Attending Physician
Lymphoma Service, Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, New York


Gynecologic Cancers
Bradley J Monk, MD
Medical Director, Late-Phase Research Program
Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute
Vice President and Member, Board of Directors
GOG Foundation
Co-Director, GOG Partners
West Palm Beach, Florida

David M O'Malley, MD
Director and Professor
Division of Gynecologic Oncology in Obstetrics and Gynecology
John G Boutselis Chair in Gynecologic Oncology
The Ohio State University and The James Comprehensive Cancer Center
Columbus, Ohio

Localized Breast Cancer; SABCS 2023 Review
Virginia Kaklamani, MD, DSc
Professor of Medicine
Ruth McLean Bowman Bowers Chair in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
AB Alexander Distinguished Chair in Oncology
Leader, Breast Oncology Program
UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center
San Antonio, Texas

Kevin Kalinsky, MD, MS
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Joyce O’Shaughnessy, MD
Sarah Cannon Research Institute


Metastatic Breast Cancer, Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, HER2-Positive Breast Cancer; SABCS 2023 Review
Erika Hamilton, MD
Sarah Cannon Research Institute

Virginia Kaklamani, MD, DSc
UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center

Hope S Rugo, MD
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center


Prostate Cancer
Emmanuel S Antonarakis, MD
Clark Endowed Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Rana R McKay, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine and Urology
Associate Director, Translational Sciences
Interim Associate Director, Clinical Sciences
Co-Lead, Genitourinary Oncology Program
University of California San Diego
Moores Cancer Center
La Jolla, California


Urothelial Bladder Cancer
Matthew D Galsky, MD
Professor of Medicine
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Co-Leader, Bladder Cancer Center of Excellence
Associate Director, Translational Research
The Tisch Cancer Institute
New York, New York

Jonathan E Rosenberg, MD
Chief, Genitourinary Medical Oncology Service
Division of Solid Tumor Oncology
Enno W Ercklentz Chair
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, New York





Renal Cell Carcinoma
Eric Jonasch, MD
Professor of Medicine
Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Brian Rini, MD
Professor of Medicine
Chief of Clinical Trials
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee


Targeted Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Ibiayi Dagogo-Jack, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

Helena Yu, MD
Medical Oncologist
Associate Attending
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, New York


Nontargeted Treatments for Lung Cancer
Edward B Garon, MD, MS
Professor
Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
Director, Signal Transduction and Therapeutics Research Program
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, California

Corey J Langer, MD
Director of Thoracic Oncology
Abramson Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Multiple Myeloma
Natalie S Callander, MD
Director, Myeloma Clinical Program
University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center
Madison, Wisconsin

Paul G Richardson, MD
Clinical Program Leader and Director of Clinical Research
Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
RJ Corman Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts


Gastroesophageal Cancers
Yelena Y Janjigian, MD
Chief of Gastrointestinal Oncology Service
Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, New York

Samuel J Klempner, MD
Associate Professor
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts


Hepatobiliary Cancers
Ghassan Abou-Alfa, MD, MBA
Attending
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Professor
Weill Cornell Medical College at Cornell University
Adjunct Professor
Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)
New York, New York

Richard S Finn, MD
Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Director, Signal Transduction and Therapeutics Program
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, California


Colorectal Cancer
Kristen K Ciombor, MD, MSCI
Associate Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Nashville, Tennessee

John Strickler, MD
Associate Professor
Associate Director, Clinical Research – GI
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina


Pancreatic Cancer
Andrew H Ko, MD
Professor and Associate Chief
Division of Hematology/Oncology
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, California

Eileen M O’Reilly, MD
Winthrop Rockefeller Endowed Chair
in Medical Oncology
Section Head, Hepatopancreaticobiliary
and Neuroendocrine Cancers
Co-Director, Medical Initiatives
David M Rubenstein Center
for Pancreatic Cancer Research
Chair, Human Research Protection Program
and IRB
Attending Physician, Member
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, New York


MODERATOR
Neil Love, MD
Research To Practice
Miami, Florida
This activity is supported by educational grants from AbbVie Inc, ADC Therapeutics, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BeiGene Ltd, Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genmab US Inc and AbbVie Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Legend Biotech, Lilly, Merck, Natera Inc, and Stemline Therapeutics Inc.

Friday to Sunday, March 22-24, 2024
Agenda (Eastern Time)

Friday, March 22nd

6:30 PM – 7:00 PM — Welcome Reception

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM — Keynote Session: ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer
MODULE 1: Optimal Integration of CDK4/6 Inhibitors into the Management of ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (mBC)

  • Long-term follow-up, including overall survival (OS) data, from pivotal clinical trials of palbociclib, ribociclib and abemaciclib in premenopausal and postmenopausal patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC
  • Key findings from and implications of other recently reported studies exploring the efficacy of up-front CDK4/6 inhibitor-based treatment, such as SONIA and RIGHT Choice
  • Factors affecting the selection of palbociclib, ribociclib or abemaciclib and an endocrine partner for ER-positive mBC
  • Spectrum, frequency and severity of clinically relevant adverse events (AEs) reported with palbociclib, ribociclib and abemaciclib
  • Available data sets, such as MAINTAIN, PACE and PALMIRA, attempting to define the utility of continuing CDK4/6 inhibitors beyond progression or rechallenging in later lines of therapy; current role in clinical practice

MODULE 2: Role of Oral Selective Estrogen Receptor Degraders (SERDs) in the Treatment of ER-Positive mBC

  • Optimal approach to assessment of relevant biomarkers, including ESR1 mutations, in patients with progressive ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC
  • Published efficacy and safety results from the Phase III EMERALD trial evaluating the oral selective estrogen receptor degrader elacestrant versus standard-of-care endocrine monotherapy for patients with pretreated ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC
  • FDA approval of elacestrant and optimal incorporation into current clinical management algorithms
  • Structural and mechanistic similarities and differences between investigational oral SERDs (eg, camizestrant, imlunestrant) and elacestrant; implications for antitumor activity and tolerability
  • Available data with and ongoing evaluation of camizestrant and imlunestrant for ER-positive mBC
  • Side-effect profiles documented with approved and investigational oral SERDs

MODULE 3: Novel Strategies Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway in ER-Positive mBC

  • Published research data with alpelisib-based treatment for patients with ER-positive mBC with a PIK3CA mutation, including those who experience progression on a CDK4/6 inhibitor
  • Practical considerations with alpelisib-based therapy, including optimal prevention, monitoring and management of AEs
  • Mechanism of action of and early clinical trial findings with capivasertib for ER-positive mBC
  • Published efficacy and safety data from the Phase III CAPItello-291 study of capivasertib/fulvestrant versus placebo/fulvestrant for ER-positive mBC progressing on aromatase inhibitor therapy with or without a CDK4/6 inhibitor
  • FDA approval of capivasertib for patients with PIK3CA/AKT1/PTEN alterations who have experienced progression on at least one endocrine-based regimen in the metastatic setting or recurrence on or within 12 months of completing adjuvant therapy
  • Optimal integration of capivasertib into current management algorithms
  • Spectrum, frequency and severity of toxicities documented with capivasertib

MODULE 4: Current and Future Role of Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) in the Management of ER-Positive mBC

  • Key efficacy and safety data, including OS findings, from the Phase III TROPiCS-02 trial evaluating sacituzumab govitecan for ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC
  • Current role and optimal sequencing of sacituzumab govitecan in the care of patients with relapsed ER-positive disease
  • Mechanistic similarities and differences between sacituzumab govitecan and datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd)
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III TROPION-Breast01 study of Dato-DXd versus investigator’s choice of chemotherapy for pretreated ER-positive, HER2-negative mBC; potential role in clinical practice
  • Updated OS findings from the DESTINY-Breast04 trial of trastuzumab deruxtecan for previously treated HER2-low mBC; sequencing of this strategy for patients with ER-positive disease
  • Early findings with and ongoing investigations of other ADCs for ER-positive mBC, such as patritumab deruxtecan
  • Incidence, spectrum, severity and management of commonly observed and more serious AEs associated with approved and investigational ADCs for ER-positive mBC

Saturday, March 23rd  

6:45 AM – 7:30 AM — Breakfast

7:30 AM – 9:10 AM — Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  • Long-term clinical trial findings with lenalidomide/rituximab for patients with treatment-naïve and relapsed/refractory (R/R) follicular lymphoma (FL)
  • Recent withdrawal of copanlisib and implications for therapeutic sequencing
  • Incidence and clinical relevance of EZH2 mutations in FL
  • Key findings with and optimal use of tazemetostat for R/R FL with and without EZH2 mutations
  • Updated efficacy and safety data from the pivotal Phase II GO29781 study evaluating mosunetuzumab monotherapy for R/R FL
  • Recent FDA approval of mosunetuzumab and optimal incorporation opposite other treatment options
  • Available findings from the Phase I ELM-1 and pivotal Phase II ELM-2 studies of odronextamab for R/R FL; FDA priority review and clinical implications
  • Results from the Phase I and Phase II EPCORE NHL-1 trial establishing the efficacy and safety of epcoritamab for R/R FL
  • Principal outcomes with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) and tisagenlecleucel (tis-cel) for R/R FL; appropriate selection of candidates for these therapies
  • Recently presented data from the TRANSCEND FL study demonstrating meaningful benefit with lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) for R/R FL; clinical implications
  • Biological rationale for, available data with, FDA review of and potential clinical role of zanubrutinib in combination with obinutuzumab in the management of R/R FL
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies under investigation for newly diagnosed and R/R FL
  • Clinical and biological factors impacting the selection and sequencing of therapy for patients with newly diagnosed and R/R mantle cell lymphoma (MCL)
  • Key efficacy and safety data from the Phase III SHINE trial evaluating ibrutinib combined with bendamustine/rituximab (BR) and maintenance rituximab as first-line treatment for older patients with newly diagnosed MCL
  • Design and principal findings of the Phase III TRIANGLE study assessing ibrutinib combined with standard first-line treatment or as a substitute for autologous stem cell transplant for younger patients with MCL
  • Early outcomes with other Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor-based approaches and combination regimens for previously untreated MCL; current role, if any, outside of a research setting
  • Ongoing Phase III studies evaluating BTK inhibitor therapy for previously untreated MCL, such as ECHO, MANGROVE and ENRICH
  • Long-term data supporting the FDA approvals of acalabrutinib and zanubrutinib for R/R MCL
  • Implications of the recent withdrawal of the indication for ibrutinib for R/R MCL
  • Key factors affecting the choice of BTK inhibitor for R/R MCL and practical use of these agents
  • Pharmacologic similarities and differences between covalent and noncovalent BTK inhibitors
  • Mechanisms of resistance to BTK inhibition; key findings from the Phase I/II BRUIN study with the noncovalent BTK inhibitor pirtobrutinib
  • Key efficacy and safety findings leading to the FDA approval of pirtobrutinib for patients with R/R MCL; optimal integration into current management algorithms
  • Key clinical research findings with and optimal integration of brexucabtagene autoleucel into current MCL treatment
  • Primary analysis of the MCL cohort of the TRANSCEND NHL 001 study of liso-cel; implications for clinical management
  • Early-phase research with venetoclax alone or combined with other agents for patients with MCL
  • Ongoing investigation of other novel agents and strategies for MCL
  • Recent results from the Phase III SWOG S1826 study comparing nivolumab and doxorubicin/vinblastine/dacarbazine (AVD) to brentuximab vedotin (BV) and AVD for previously untreated advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL)
  • Overall survival and other key efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III ECHELON-1 trial evaluating BV and AVD versus doxorubicin/bleomycin/vinblastine/dacarbazine for newly diagnosed advanced cHL
  • Available data with BV-based regimens for older patients with newly diagnosed advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)
  • Early findings with BV combined with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy for early-stage HL
  • Other studies exploring the utility of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies with chemotherapy for early- and advanced-stage HL
  • Potential role of BV alone or with chemotherapy or immune checkpoint inhibition as a bridge to transplant
  • Key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III KEYNOTE-204 trial evaluating pembrolizumab versus BV for R/R HL
  • Published data and ongoing evaluation of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies with other systemic approaches, such as BV or chemotherapy, for R/R HL
  • Principal efficacy and safety findings with and planned Phase III evaluation of camidanlumab tesirine for heavily pretreated HL
  • Other promising agents and strategies for patients with HL, such as investigational immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy
  • Published results with polatuzumab vedotin in combination with chemotherapy for previously untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
  • FDA approval of polatuzumab vedotin as a component of up-front therapy and identification of candidates for this treatment
  • Clinical trial experience with and ongoing evaluation of BTK inhibitors for newly diagnosed DLBCL
  • Clinical and biological factors influencing the selection of therapy for patients with R/R DLBCL
  • Key findings with polatuzumab vedotin in combination with BR for R/R DLBCL
  • Efficacy and safety outcomes with tafasitamab/lenalidomide for patients with R/R DLBCL; early results and ongoing evaluation in the front-line setting
  • Available efficacy and safety data with loncastuximab tesirine for R/R DLBCL; optimal sequencing opposite other approved regimens
  • Long-term findings with axi-cel, tis-cel and liso-cel for multiregimen-relapsed DLBCL
  • Results from key studies evaluating CAR T-cell therapy as second-line treatment for DLBCL
  • FDA approvals of axi-cel and liso-cel as second-line therapy and identification of candidates for this strategy
  • Key efficacy and safety data supporting the FDA approvals of glofitamab and epcoritamab for patients with R/R DLBCL; optimal sequencing of and practical implementation of these agents
  • Pivotal trial results with odronextamab for DLBCL; FDA priority review and potential role in clinical practice
  • Other novel agents and strategies under investigation for DLBCL

9:10 AM – 9:30 AM — BREAK

9:30 AM – 10:20 AM — Gynecologic Cancers
Ovarian Cancer (OC)

  • Clinical significance of somatic and germline BRCA mutations and homologous recombination deficiency status for treatment decision-making in advanced OC; optimal approaches to biomarker testing for patients with newly diagnosed disease
  • Long-term findings with olaparib, niraparib and olaparib/bevacizumab maintenance for patients with newly diagnosed OC; factors affecting selection among these strategies
  • Biological rationale for combining PARP inhibitors with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies with or without bevacizumab for OC
  • Design, eligibility criteria and major efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III DUO-O study of up-front durvalumab in combination with chemotherapy and bevacizumab followed by durvalumab, olaparib and bevacizumab as maintenance therapy; clinical implications
  • Other ongoing research efforts evaluating PARP inhibitors in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors for advanced OC
  • Long-term follow-up from pivotal trials evaluating niraparib, olaparib and rucaparib for platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant recurrent OC; implications of the voluntary withdrawal of various PARP inhibitor indications in the relapsed setting
  • Utility of PARP inhibitor rechallenge for patients who have experienced disease progression on a previous PARP inhibitor
  • Biological rationale for targeting folate receptor alpha in OC; mechanism of action of mirvetuximab soravtansine
  • Available efficacy and safety data, including recently presented findings from the Phase III MIRASOL trial, with mirvetuximab soravtansine for patients with folate receptor alpha-positive, platinum-resistant OC
  • Recent FDA approval of mirvetuximab soravtansine; implications for biomarker assessment and current OC management
  • Other ongoing studies of mirvetuximab soravtansine for platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive OC
  • Outcomes observed in the cohort of patients with OC in the Phase II DESTINY-PanTumor02 trial of trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) for pretreated HER2-expressing solid tumors; potential role outside of a research setting
  • Frequency of cadherin-6 (CDH6) overexpression in OC
  • Available research findings with the novel CDH6-directed antibody-drug conjugate raludotatug deruxtecan for heavily pretreated platinum-resistant OC
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies under investigation for patients with advanced OC

Endometrial Cancer (EC) and Cervical Cancer (CC)

  • Key efficacy and safety data from the Phase III RUBY and NRG-GY018 trials evaluating dostarlimab and pembrolizumab, respectively, in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced or recurrent EC
  • FDA approval of dostarlimab in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by single-agent dostarlimab for patients with primary advanced or recurrent mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient/microsatellite instability-high EC
  • Emerging overall survival results from the RUBY trial; implications for current and future disease management
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III AtTEnd/ENGOT-en7 trial evaluating atezolizumab in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy as front-line treatment for advanced or recurrent EC
  • Available efficacy and safety results from the Phase III DUO-E trial evaluating first-line therapy with durvalumab in combination with chemotherapy followed by durvalumab maintenance with or without olaparib for patients with newly diagnosed advanced or recurrent EC; implications for clinical practice
  • Major efficacy and safety findings supporting the use of lenvatinib in combination with pembrolizumab for patients with previously treated MMR-proficient advanced EC
  • Optimal integration of pembrolizumab/lenvatinib into current EC management algorithms and ongoing evaluation as first-line therapy
  • Incidence and management of toxicities with pembrolizumab/lenvatinib
  • Mechanism of action of selinexor and scientific rationale for its evaluation in EC
  • Available efficacy and safety findings with and ongoing Phase III evaluation of selinexor as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced/recurrent EC
  • Results from the Phase III KEYNOTE-A18 trial evaluating the addition of pembrolizumab to external beam radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy followed by brachytherapy versus concurrent chemoradiation therapy alone for newly diagnosed patients with high-risk locally advanced CC
  • Recent results from the GCIG INTERLACE trial establishing the benefit of induction chemotherapy prior to chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced CC
  • Long-term findings from the Phase III KEYNOTE-826 study of pembrolizumab in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab as up-front therapy for advanced CC; optimal integration into patient care
  • Rationale for targeting tissue factor in CC; mechanism of action, structural components, early research findings, and FDA approval of tisotumab vedotin
  • Recently presented findings from the confirmatory Phase III innovaTV 301 trial evaluating tisotumab vedotin versus investigator’s choice of chemotherapy for patients who experience disease progression on or after front-line therapy
  • Optimal integration of tisotumab vedotin into routine clinical practice
  • Early data with and ongoing evaluation of tisotumab vedotin in combination with other anticancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and pembrolizumab, for patients with metastatic CC
  • Antitumor activity observed with T-DXd in the EC and CC cohorts of the DESTINY-PanTumor02 study; potential role in the treatment of these diseases
  • Other promising agents and strategies under investigation for EC and CC

10:20 AM – 11:10 AM — Localized Breast Cancer; SABCS 2023 Review
Localized HER2-Positive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

  • Selection of an appropriate neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant regimen for patients with HER2-positive localized breast cancer
  • Clinical factors guiding the use of neratinib as extended-adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive localized breast cancer; appropriate identification of patients for this treatment
  • Dose escalation and other available approaches to mitigate neratinib-associated gastrointestinal toxicities
  • Ongoing evaluation of novel HER2-targeted strategies for HER2-positive localized breast cancer
  • Recommended approaches to biomarker assessment for patients with localized triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)
  • Long-term data from the Phase III KEYNOTE-522 study of neoadjuvant pembrolizumab combined with chemotherapy and continued as a single agent after surgery for high-risk localized TNBC
  • Patient selection for and practical application of neoadjuvant and adjuvant pembrolizumab
  • Key efficacy and safety findings, including overall survival outcomes, among patients with TNBC in the Phase III OlympiA trial assessing adjuvant olaparib versus placebo for high-risk BRCA-mutated, HER2-negative breast cancer
  • Current clinical role of adjuvant olaparib for patients with TNBC and a germline BRCA1/2 mutation
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies under investigation for patients with localized TNBC

Localized ER-Positive Breast Cancer

  • Rationale for the evaluation of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in the (neo)adjuvant setting for patients with high-risk ER-positive localized breast cancer
  • Recently presented findings from the KEYNOTE-756 and CheckMate 7FL studies indicating an improvement in pathologic complete response rate with the addition of pembrolizumab or nivolumab, respectively, to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer; clinical implications
  • Factors in the decision to consult a genomic assay for patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative localized breast cancer
  • Key studies informing the use of the 21-gene Recurrence Score® to guide neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment decision-making; practical interpretation of the Recurrence Score
  • Optimal selection, timing of initiation and duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy for patients with ER-positive breast cancer; current clinical role of ovarian function suppression (OFS) for premenopausal women
  • Utility of OFS as a means to preserve fertility and/or prevent chemotherapy-induced premature ovarian insufficiency in premenopausal patients with breast cancer
  • Long-term efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III monarchE trial evaluating the addition of abemaciclib to standard adjuvant hormonal therapy for patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer at high risk for recurrence
  • Published data from the Phase III NATALEE trial investigating the role of adjuvant ribociclib with endocrine therapy for localized ER-positive breast cancer
  • Identification of appropriate candidates for and optimal use of adjuvant CDK4/6 inhibitors
  • Key findings with and current clinical role of adjuvant olaparib for patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer and a germline BRCA1/2 mutation

11:10 AM – 12:00 PM — Metastatic Breast Cancer, Triple-Negative Breast
                                         Cancer, HER2-Positive Breast Cancer; SABCS 2023 Review

  • Clinical and biological factors affecting the selection and sequencing of therapy for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (mBC)
  • Long-term results from the HER2CLIMB study of tucatinib/trastuzumab/capecitabine for multiregimen-relapsed HER2-positive mBC
  • Recently presented data from the Phase III HER2CLIMB-02 trial of tucatinib in combination with T-DM1 for patients with HER2-positive mBC who have received previous treatment with a taxane and trastuzumab
  • Published findings from key studies (eg, DESTINY-Breast01, DESTINY-Breast02, DESTINY-Breast03) evaluating trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) for HER2-positive mBC
  • Incidence of brain metastases in patients with HER2-positive mBC; CNS activity observed with tucatinib/trastuzumab/capecitabine and T-DXd
  • Optimal integration of tucatinib/trastuzumab/capecitabine and T-DXd for HER2-positive mBC in patients with and without brain metastases
  • Spectrum, frequency and severity of toxicities associated with tucatinib and T-DXd; recommendations for monitoring, prevention and management
  • Ongoing studies attempting to further define the role of tucatinib and T-DXd for HER2-positive mBC
  • Other promising agents and strategies under development for HER2-positive mBC
  • Recommended approaches to biomarker assessment for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC)
  • Extended follow-up with pembrolizumab/chemotherapy for previously untreated PD-L1-positive mTNBC
  • Long-term data guiding the use of PARP inhibitors for patients with mTNBC and BRCA mutations
  • Published research comparing sacituzumab govitecan to single-agent chemotherapy of physician’s choice for relapsed/refractory mTNBC
  • Current role and optimal sequencing of sacituzumab govitecan for mTNBC
  • Incidence, severity and optimal management of toxicities (eg, neutropenia, diarrhea) associated with sacituzumab govitecan
  • Rationale for the clinical activity of T-DXd in patients with HER2-low breast cancer
  • Key findings from the DESTINY-Breast04 trial of T-DXd for previously treated HER2-low mBC; sequencing of this strategy for ER-negative disease
  • Early findings with and ongoing investigations of other novel antibody-drug conjugates (eg, datopotamab deruxtecan, patritumab deruxtecan) for mTNBC
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies under investigation for patients with mTNBC

12:00 PM – 12:30 PM — LUNCH

12:30 PM – 1:20 PM — Prostate Cancer
Role of Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Management

  • Indications for and selection of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with prostate cancer
  • Available data with the addition of abiraterone and prednisolone with or without enzalutamide to ADT for high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer
  • Major efficacy results from the Phase III EMBARK study of enzalutamide alone and combined with leuprolide for patients with nonmetastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (HSPC) and high-risk biochemical recurrence; recent FDA approval
  • Health-related quality of life and other safety and tolerability findings from the EMBARK trial
  • Current and potential nonresearch role of enzalutamide/ADT for nonmetastatic HSPC
  • Published data from the Phase III PRESTO trial evaluating the role of ADT intensification with apalutamide in the treatment of biochemically recurrent prostate cancer
  • Other ongoing clinical trials investigating secondary hormonal agents for nonmetastatic HSPC
  • Long-term research documenting the effectiveness of enzalutamide, apalutamide and darolutamide for nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC); factors guiding selection among these agents
  • Disease- and patient-specific considerations in the selection of therapy for metastatic HSPC (mHSPC)
  • Extended follow-up with docetaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide or apalutamide in combination with ADT for mHSPC
  • Key findings from the Phase III PEACE-1 study of docetaxel with or without abiraterone with or without local radiation therapy for mHSPC
  • Published efficacy and safety data from the Phase III ARASENS trial evaluating darolutamide in combination with docetaxel and ADT for mHSPC; optimal selection of candidates for this strategy

Evidence-Based Use of Other Therapeutic Approaches

  • Incidence of BRCA1/2 and other homologous recombination repair abnormalities in patients with prostate cancer; indications for and practical implementation of genetic testing
  • Long-term data with olaparib and rucaparib monotherapy for metastatic CRPC (mCRPC)
  • Biological rationale for combining PARP inhibitors with androgen receptor pathway inhibitors for prostate cancer
  • Key findings from the Phase III PROpel, MAGNITUDE and TALAPRO-2 trials combining olaparib and abiraterone, niraparib and abiraterone and talazoparib and enzalutamide, respectively, in the first-line setting
  • FDA-approved indications for olaparib/abiraterone, niraparib/abiraterone and talazoparib/enzalutamide; optimal incorporation into clinical practice
  • Appropriate integration of radium-223 chloride into mCRPC treatment algorithms
  • Published Phase III data sets with lutetium Lu 177 vipivotide tetraxetan for PSMA-positive mCRPC, such as from the VISION and PSMAfore studies; optimal sequencing with other available therapies
  • Early data with lutetium Lu 177 vipivotide tetraxetan in combination with other systemic therapies, such as pembrolizumab or olaparib
  • Appropriate integration of cabazitaxel into mCRPC treatment algorithms and practical considerations with its use
  • Biological rationale for and early-phase data with the combination of cabozantinib and atezolizumab for mCRPC
  • Emerging positive findings from the Phase III CONTACT-02 evaluating cabozantinib/atezolizumab for mCRPC; clinical implications
  • Other novel agents and strategies under investigation for prostate cancer

1:20 PM – 2:10 PM — Urothelial Bladder Cancer
Nonmetastatic Urothelial Bladder Cancer (nmUBC)

  • Key findings informing the selection of patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) for pembrolizumab therapy
  • Ongoing Phase III trials investigating the combination of BCG and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies for BCG-naïve and BCG-unresponsive NMIBC
  • Outcomes achieved in early trials evaluating neoadjuvant immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for resectable muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC)
  • Long-term data from the Phase III CheckMate 274 trial supporting the use of adjuvant nivolumab for high-risk MIBC; patient selection for this approach
  • Emerging findings from the Phase III AMBASSADOR/KEYNOTE-123 study indicating improved disease-free survival with adjuvant pembrolizumab for patients with MIBC
  • Ongoing Phase III studies evaluating other anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody-based strategies for MIBC
  • Mechanism of antitumor activity of the novel intravesical drug delivery system TAR-200
  • Recently presented findings with TAR-200 for BCG-unresponsive high-risk NMIBC from cohort 2 of the Phase IIb SunRISe-1 trial; other ongoing studies of TAR-200 with and without the anti-PD-1 antibody cetrelimab for NMIBC and MIBC
  • Early results with and ongoing evaluation of other novel agents, such as enfortumab vedotin and FGFR-targeted therapy, for patients with nmUBC

Metastatic Urothelial Bladder Cancer (mUBC)

  • Current clinical role of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies as monotherapy or as maintenance in the front-line setting for patients with mUBC
  • Key efficacy and safety data from the Phase III EV-302/KEYNOTE-A39 study of enfortumab vedotin in combination with pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy for previously untreated mUBC; implications for clinical practice
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III CheckMate 901 substudy of nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for cisplatin-eligible patients with mUBC; potential role of this strategy in clinical practice
  • Long-term findings with enfortumab vedotin for patients with progressive mUBC; optimal integration into current treatment paradigms
  • Key efficacy and safety data, including those from the Phase III THOR trial, with erdafitinib for patients with relapsed mUBC and susceptible FGFR3 or FGFR2 alterations; current role in clinical practice
  • Principal efficacy and safety findings with sacituzumab govitecan for patients with progressive mUBC
  • Optimal use of and ongoing evaluation of sacituzumab govitecan for mUBC
  • Frequency of HER2 expression in mUBC; current indications for HER2 testing
  • Outcomes observed in the cohort of patients with mUBC in the Phase II DESTINY-PanTumor02 trial of trastuzumab deruxtecan; current off-protocol role, if any, in clinical practice
  • Available efficacy and safety data with the HER2-targeted antibody-drug conjugate disitamab vedotin for previously treated HER2-positive and HER2-low or HER2-negative mUBC; potential role in clinical practice
  • Other promising agents and strategies under investigation for urothelial bladder cancer

2:10 PM – 3:00 PM — Renal Cell Carcinoma
Current Management of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)

  • Key findings, including emerging overall survival data, from the Phase III KEYNOTE-564 trial of adjuvant pembrolizumab for high-risk clear cell RCC; patient selection for this approach
  • Clinical trial database supporting the use of nivolumab/ipilimumab, pembrolizumab/axitinib or avelumab/axitinib for treatment-naïve advanced RCC
  • Long-term data from the Phase III CheckMate 9ER study of nivolumab in combination with cabozantinib for previously untreated advanced RCC; optimal integration into clinical practice
  • Extended follow-up from the Phase III CLEAR study of lenvatinib in combination with pembrolizumab as first-line treatment for advanced RCC; current role in practice
  • Major efficacy and safety outcomes from the Phase III COSMIC-313 trial of nivolumab/ipilimumab/cabozantinib for previously untreated intermediate- or poor-risk advanced RCC; potential role of up-front triplet therapy
  • Emerging results from the Phase III CheckMate 67T study demonstrating noninferior pharmacokinetics and objective response rate with subcutaneous versus intravenous nivolumab; clinical implications
  • Rational sequencing of available therapies for patients with RCC who experience disease progression on first-line treatment; patient-specific factors affecting decision-making in this setting
  • Available efficacy and safety data with and current clinical role of tivozanib for metastatic RCC
  • Ongoing Phase III TiNivo-2 study evaluating tivozanib/nivolumab versus tivozanib alone for patients with RCC and disease progression on an immune checkpoint inhibitor

Novel Investigational Approaches; Current and Future Management of Non-Clear Cell RCC

  • Biological rationale for targeting HIF-2α in patients with advanced RCC; early data with belzutifan as monotherapy and in combination with other agents for metastatic RCC
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III LITESPARK-005 study of belzutifan for patients with advanced RCC who experience disease progression after checkpoint inhibitor and VEGF tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies
  • FDA approval of belzutifan and the potential clinical role of that agent in the care of patients with advanced RCC
  • Incidence and management of various non-clear cell RCC subtypes
  • Mechanism of action of zanzalintinib; pharmacologic similarities and differences between zanzalintinib and cabozantinib
  • Recently presented results from the Phase I STELLAR-001 trial evaluating zanzalintinib in patients with heavily pretreated clear cell RCC, including those who received prior cabozantinib
  • Early data with zanzalintinib for patients with nonclear cell RCC
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key endpoints of the Phase III STELLAR-304 trial evaluating zanzalintinib/nivolumab as first-line treatment for non-clear cell RCC; estimated completion date
  • Published data with other novel treatment strategies, such as pembrolizumab/lenvatinib, cabozantinib and cabozantinib/nivolumab, for non-clear cell RCC
  • Key outcomes supporting the use of belzutifan for patients with von Hippel-Lindau-associated RCC
  • Other novel agents and strategies with promising activity in patients with clear cell and non-clear cell RCC

3:00 PM – 3:20 PM — BREAK

3:20 PM – 4:10 PM — Targeted Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with an EGFR Mutation

  • Long-term data, including overall survival outcomes, from the Phase III ADAURA trial of adjuvant osimertinib for Stage IB to IIIA NSCLC with an EGFR mutation; optimal selection of patients for this strategy
  • Current up-front management of metastatic NSCLC with an EGFR mutation, including for patients with CNS metastases
  • Key efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III FLAURA2 trial supporting the recent FDA approval of osimertinib in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for metastatic NSCLC with an EGFR mutation; clinical implications
  • Recently presented data from the Phase III MARIPOSA study evaluating amivantamab/lazertinib versus osimertinib as first-line treatment for patients with NSCLC and EGFR mutations; potential ramifications in practice
  • Spectrum and clinical relevance of osimertinib resistance mechanisms; early data with and ongoing studies of osimertinib combined with other agents for patients with progressive disease
  • Recently presented findings with amivantamab in combination with chemotherapy with and without lazertinib for patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC and disease progression on osimertinib in the Phase III MARIPOSA-2 study; potential role for this approach
  • Biological rationale for targeting HER3 in EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistant NSCLC; mechanism of action of patritumab deruxtecan
  • Published efficacy and safety findings from the HERTHENA-Lung01 study of patritumab deruxtecan for EGFR-mutated NSCLC after disease progression on EGFR TKI therapy and platinum-based chemotherapy; potential clinical role
  • Published data supporting the use of amivantamab for patients with metastatic NSCLC and EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, including data from the Phase III PAPILLON trial combining amivantamab with chemotherapy in the first-line setting
  • Available efficacy and safety data with datopotamab deruxtecan for patients with actionable mutations; implications for clinical practice

Care of Patients with Other Targetable Genomic Abnormalities

  • Recently presented data from the Phase III ALINA study evaluating adjuvant alectinib versus platinum-based chemotherapy for resected Stage IB to IIIA NSCLC with an ALK fusion; implications for the management of localized ALK-positive disease
  • Key findings with novel ALK inhibitors (eg, alectinib, brigatinib, lorlatinib) for metastatic NSCLC with an ALK fusion; clinical factors in the choice of up-front treatment
  • Efficacy and safety findings with trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) for NSCLC with a HER2 mutation; current clinical role
  • Published data with and nonresearch role, if any, of T-DXd for HER2-overexpressing NSCLC
  • Key data sets with and practical implementation of capmatinib and tepotinib for patients with NSCLC and MET exon 14 mutations
  • Recent FDA approval of encorafenib/binimetinib for patients with NSCLC and BRAF V600E mutations; implications for practice
  • Appropriate integration of entrectinib into clinical practice for NSCLC with a ROS1 rearrangement, including for patients with CNS involvement
  • Available data with and recent FDA approval of repotrectinib for NSCLC with a ROS1 rearrangement
  • Pivotal data sets supporting the FDA approvals of selpercatinib and pralsetinib for patients with RET fusion-driven advanced NSCLC
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III LIBRETTO-431 study of selpercatinib versus chemotherapy with or without pembrolizumab for patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC and RET fusions; implications for therapeutic sequencing
  • Available efficacy and safety data with sotorasib and with adagrasib for advanced NSCLC with a KRAS G12C mutation; optimal integration into practice
  • Other novel approaches for patients with NSCLC and actionable genomic abnormalities

4:10 PM – 5:00 PM — Nontargeted Treatments for Lung Cancer
Role of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors (ICIs) in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

  • Published data with the addition of nivolumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with resectable NSCLC; appropriate selection of candidates for this strategy
  • Available research findings with durvalumab and pembrolizumab, respectively, in combination with chemotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy and continued as a single agent after surgery; overall survival advantage with pembrolizumab in this setting
  • FDA approval of perioperative pembrolizumab and current role of this strategy in routine practice
  • Recently presenting findings from the Phase III CheckMate 77T study comparing neoadjuvant nivolumab and chemotherapy to neoadjuvant placebo and chemotherapy before surgery and adjuvant nivolumab or placebo for resectable Stage II to Stage IIIB NSCLC; clinical implications
  • Key data supporting the FDA approvals of atezolizumab and pembrolizumab as adjuvant treatment after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy; current role in clinical practice
  • Long-term findings with consolidation durvalumab after chemoradiation therapy for unresectable Stage III NSCLC; patient selection and practical implementation
  • Mechanisms of antitumor activity of oleclumab and monalizumab; efficacy and safety observed when combining these agents with durvalumab consolidation for locally advanced NSCLC
  • Factors affecting the selection of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monotherapy versus chemoimmunotherapy versus dual immune checkpoint inhibition with or without chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic NSCLC without a targetable tumor mutation
  • Major findings from clinical trials evaluating pembrolizumab, atezolizumab and cemiplimab administered as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC
  • Long-term data with dual immune checkpoint inhibition with or without chemotherapy for previously untreated metastatic NSCLC
  • Preliminary data with ICIs in combination with other systemic therapies, such as anti-angiogenic agents and ceralasertib, for patients with NSCLC who have experienced progression on anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody-containing treatment

Other Available and Emerging Therapeutic Approaches for NSCLC without a Targetable Tumor Mutation

  • Current management paradigm for NSCLC that has progressed on anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody-based therapy in the first-line setting
  • Scientific rationale for targeting TROP2 in NSCLC; structural components and mechanism of action of the TROP2-targeted antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) sacituzumab govitecan and datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd)
  • Available data with Dato-DXd alone and in combination with other systemic therapies
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III TROPION-Lung01 study of Dato-DXd versus docetaxel for patients with previously treated NSCLC; potential role in clinical practice
  • Available data with and ongoing evaluations of sacituzumab govitecan alone or in combination for advanced NSCLC
  • Incidence of CEACAM5 expression in NSCLC; potential as a therapeutic target
  • Mechanism of action of, available efficacy and safety data with, and ongoing evaluation of tusamitamab ravtansine for advanced nonsquamous NSCLC
  • Frequency of c-MET overexpression in patients with lung cancer; structural components and mechanism of action of novel ADC telisotuzumab vedotin
  • Published research findings with, FDA breakthrough therapy designation for, and ongoing evaluation of telisotuzumab vedotin
  • Mechanism of action of and early clinical activity observed with tumor treating fields (TTFields) for advanced NSCLC
  • Principal efficacy and safety findings from the Phase III LUNAR study assessing TTFields in combination with standard therapy for metastatic NSCLC after platinum failure
  • Other novel agents and strategies under investigation for patients with NSCLC without a targetable tumor mutation

5:00 PM — ADJOURN

Sunday, March 24th  

6:45 AM – 7:30 AM — Breakfast

7:30 AM – 8:20 AM — Multiple Myeloma
Optimizing the Current Management of Multiple Myeloma (MM)

  • Long-term findings with daratumumab-containing front-line regimens for newly diagnosed MM; role in therapy for patients who are eligible and ineligible for transplant
  • Published data with novel daratumumab-based quadruplet regimens for transplant-eligible patients with newly diagnosed MM
  • Mechanistic similarities and differences between daratumumab and isatuximab; implications for efficacy and tolerability
  • Key efficacy and safety findings with isatuximab-based combinations for transplant-eligible patients with newly diagnosed MM; potential role of isatuximab in the up-front setting
  • Implications for routine practice of published studies evaluating carfilzomib-based induction regimens
  • Key Phase III findings with the addition of elotuzumab to carfilzomib/lenalidomide/dexamethasone for transplant-eligible patients with newly diagnosed MM; clinical implications
  • Available data with and current role of minimal residual disease assessment in therapeutic decision-making for patients with MM
  • Selection of an optimal maintenance-therapy approach for transplant-eligible and ineligible patients, including those with high-risk disease
  • Major clinical trial and real-world data sets with ixazomib therapy in the induction, maintenance and relapsed settings
  • Clinical, biological and practical factors in the selection and sequencing of available therapies for relapsed/refractory (R/R) MM
  • Updated findings from the Phase III ICARIA-MM and IKEMA studies of isatuximab in combination with standard doublet regimens for R/R MM; FDA-approved indication for and optimal use of isatuximab
  • Published efficacy and safety data supporting the use of selinexor in combination with a proteasome inhibitor, such as bortezomib or carfilzomib, for patients with R/R MM
  • Optimal incorporation of selinexor into routine practice and practical considerations with its use

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy, Bispecific Antibodies and Other Novel Approaches

  • Principal efficacy and safety results supporting the FDA approvals of idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel) and ciltacabtagene autoleucel (cilta-cel) for triple class-exposed MM; selection of patients for CAR T-cell therapy
  • Published findings with ide-cel and cilta-cel in earlier lines of treatment; potential for moving CAR T-cell therapy up in therapy sequencing
  • Early data with and ongoing clinical research evaluating CAR T-cell platforms with targets beyond BCMA
  • Similarities and differences among various BCMA-directed bispecific antibodies, such as teclistamab, elranatamab, linvoseltamab and alnuctamab
  • Available efficacy and safety findings leading to the FDA approvals of teclistamab and elranatamab; optimal incorporation into current management algorithms
  • Efficacy and safety documented with investigational anti-BCMA bispecific antibodies, such as alnuctamab, linvoseltamab and ABBV-383, for pretreated MM
  • Available efficacy and safety findings with non-BCMA-targeted bispecific antibodies, such as talquetamab or cevostamab, for MM
  • FDA approval of talquetamab and optimal incorporation into current disease management
  • Rationale for and early-phase data with bispecific antibodies in combination with other systemic therapies, including other bispecific-antibody platforms, for MM
  • Principal efficacy and safety findings with belantamab mafodotin monotherapy for R/R MM; withdrawal of the approved indication and implications for therapeutic sequencing
  • Early data with and ongoing evaluation of belantamab mafodotin in combination with other systemic therapies; potential role of this strategy in disease management
  • Biological rationale for the evaluation of venetoclax for MM; available efficacy and safety findings with venetoclax/dexamethasone for patients with translocation 11;14
  • Current nonresearch role, if any, of venetoclax in the treatment of MM
  • Early research findings with and ongoing investigation of venetoclax in combination with other systemic agents frequently used in the care of patients with MM
  • Mechanism of action of cereblon E3 ligase modulators (CELMoDs), such as iberdomide and mezigdomide; similarities and differences between CELMoDs and standard immunomodulatory drugs
  • Activity and safety observed with CELMoDs in patients with heavily pretreated MM; ongoing evaluation and potential role in therapy
  • Other promising novel strategies in clinical development for patients with MM

8:20 AM – 9:10 AM — Gastroesophageal Cancers
Current and Potential Role of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Cancers

  • Early data with immune checkpoint inhibitors as neoadjuvant therapy for resectable microsatellite instability-high/mismatch repair-deficient gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma
  • Improvement in pathologic complete response rate with the addition of durvalumab to neoadjuvant FLOT (fluorouracil/leucovorin/oxaliplatin/docetaxel) for patients with resectable gastric/GEJ cancer in the Phase III MATTERHORN trial
  • Ongoing evaluation of perioperative durvalumab in the MATTERHORN study and potential clinical role of this strategy
  • Efficacy and safety findings with adjuvant nivolumab for resected esophageal or GEJ cancer; appropriate selection of patients for this strategy
  • Published data sets demonstrating the efficacy and safety of first-line nivolumab- and pembrolizumab-containing regimens for advanced gastric, GEJ and esophageal cancer
  • Evidence-based selection among chemotherapy alone, combined chemoimmunotherapy and dual immune checkpoint inhibition for patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal tumors; use of PD-L1 expression, tumor location and histology in decision-making
  • Mechanism of action of tislelizumab; similarities and differences with commercially available anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies
  • Key findings from Phase III trials assessing tislelizumab in combination with chemotherapy for previously untreated gastroesophageal cancers and as second-line monotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; potential clinical role
  • Published data supporting the addition of pembrolizumab to chemotherapy/trastuzumab for previously untreated HER2-positive advanced gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma; correlation of PD-L1 status and patient outcomes
  • Early data with and ongoing studies evaluating other immune checkpoint inhibitor-based strategies for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic gastroesophageal cancers

Other Available and Emerging Therapeutic Approaches

  • Biological rationale for targeting claudin 18.2 (CLDN18.2) in gastric/GEJ cancer; mechanism of antitumor activity of zolbetuximab
  • Key efficacy and safety results of the Phase III SPOTLIGHT and GLOW trials evaluating zolbetuximab in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for patients with CLDN18.2-positive advanced gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma
  • Potential clinical role of up-front zolbetuximab/chemotherapy and implications for biomarker assessment
  • Mechanism of antitumor activity and ongoing Phase I clinical evaluation of the CLDN18.2-targeted antibody-drug conjugate EO-3021
  • Efficacy and safety findings from pivotal studies evaluating trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) for patients with progressive HER2-positive gastric/GEJ cancer
  • Optimal integration of T-DXd into the disease management paradigm
  • Mechanism of action of the novel HER2-targeted bispecific antibody zanidatamab
  • Published findings with and ongoing investigation of zanidatamab-based therapy for advanced HER2-positive gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma
  • Published research with ramucirumab for metastatic gastroesophageal cancers
  • Antitumor activity observed with ramucirumab in patients experiencing disease progression on an immune checkpoint inhibitor; implications for therapeutic sequencing
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies for patients with gastroesophageal cancers

9:10 AM – 9:30 AM — BREAK

9:30 AM – 10:20 AM — Hepatobiliary Cancers
Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

  • Historical outcomes associated with locoregional treatment approaches, such as resection, ablation and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), among patients with early- and intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Key efficacy and safety results from the Phase III IMbrave050 study of atezolizumab/bevacizumab for patients with early-stage HCC at high risk of recurrence after surgery or ablation; clinical implications
  • Emerging findings from the Phase III EMERALD-1 study indicating a progression-free survival advantage with durvalumab in combination with TACE and bevacizumab compared to TACE alone for patients with locoregional HCC not amenable to curative therapy; ramifications for routine practice
  • Factors affecting the selection of first- and later-line treatments for advanced HCC
  • Long-term findings supporting the use of first-line atezolizumab/bevacizumab for unresectable HCC
  • Efficacy and safety outcomes, including updated overall survival results, reported with durvalumab/tremelimumab for previously untreated advanced HCC in the Phase III HIMALAYA study; current role in clinical practice
  • Appropriate selection of candidates with unresectable HCC for first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) monotherapy
  • Role of multitargeted TKIs approved in the first-line setting, such as sorafenib and lenvatinib, in relapsed disease
  • Long-term outcomes with approved anti-angiogenic agents, such as cabozantinib and regorafenib, for patients with progressive HCC
  • Published data sets with FDA-approved agents and regimens for patients with multiregimen-refractory HCC or those with compromised hepatic function
  • Other promising treatment strategies under investigation for HCC

Biliary Tract Cancers (BTCs)

  • Principal findings with the addition of durvalumab to first-line chemotherapy for advanced BTCs; optimal integration into practice
  • Published results from the Phase III KEYNOTE-966 study of pembrolizumab combined with cisplatin/gemcitabine as first-line treatment for advanced BTCs; recent FDA approval and current role in clinical practice
  • Spectrum and frequency of targetable molecular alterations in advanced BTCs; optimal timing and method of genomic analysis
  • Available findings with pemigatinib and futibatinib for pretreated, unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with an FGFR2 fusion or other rearrangement
  • Evidence-based sequencing of and selection between pemigatinib and futibatinib for FGFR-altered cholangiocarcinoma
  • Available efficacy and safety outcomes with and optimal integration of ivosidenib into treatment for cholangiocarcinoma with an IDH1 mutation
  • Efficacy and safety observed with trastuzumab deruxtecan for HER2-expressing BTCs and BTCs with a HER2 mutation
  • Outcomes from the pivotal HERIZON-BTC-01 study of the novel HER2-targeted bispecific antibody zanidatamab for previously treated advanced or metastatic HER2-amplified BTCs
  • Key efficacy and safety findings among patients with previously treated HER2-positive BTCs from the Phase II SGNTUC-019 basket study of tucatinib/trastuzumab
  • Current off-protocol and potential future role of HER2-targeted therapy in advanced BTCs
  • Other promising investigational treatment strategies for advanced BTCs

10:20 AM – 11:10 AM — Colorectal Cancer
Biomarker-Directed Approaches for Colorectal Cancer (CRC)

  • Indications for, timing of and optimal approaches to biomarker testing in CRC
  • Early data with and ongoing investigation of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H)/mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) localized CRC
  • Rational incorporation of pembrolizumab, nivolumab and nivolumab/ipilimumab for patients with MSI-H/dMMR metastatic CRC (mCRC)
  • Appropriate integration of encorafenib/cetuximab into clinical practice for patients with mCRC with a BRAF V600E mutation
  • Early findings with and ongoing evaluation of first-line BRAF-targeted therapy
  • Key efficacy and safety findings from the pivotal Phase II MOUNTAINEER trial evaluating tucatinib/trastuzumab for previously treated HER2-positive mCRC
  • FDA approval and current role of tucatinib/trastuzumab in clinical practice
  • Available efficacy and safety findings with trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) for patients with HER2-expressing mCRC, such as from the DESTINY-CRC01 and DESTINY-CRC02 trials
  • Current and potential future role of T-DXd in the management of HER2-positive mCRC outside of a research setting
  • Early results with KRAS G12C inhibitors, such as sotorasib and adagrasib, with or without anti-EGFR therapy for patients with mCRC
  • Recently presented findings from the Phase III CodeBreaK 300 study of sotorasib and panitumumab versus standard-of-care therapy for patients with chemorefractory mCRC with a KRAS G12C mutation; potential role of this strategy in clinical practice

Other Available and Emerging Therapeutic Strategies

  • Mechanistic rationale for and published data with circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) testing in localized CRC
  • Ongoing studies examining the clinical utility of ctDNA testing for guiding treatment decisions and monitoring recurrence in CRC
  • Correlation between the location of the primary tumor (right versus left side) and outcomes with EGFR antibody-based regimens among patients with mCRC
  • Antitumor activity of EGFR antibodies among patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) mCRC; effectiveness of rechallenge after prior EGFR antibody-containing therapy
  • Long-term findings from pivotal Phase III trials assessing regorafenib and TAS-102 monotherapy for patients with multiregimen-relapsed mCRC
  • Practical considerations, including optimal dosing, with the use of regorafenib
  • Published efficacy and safety data from the Phase III SUNLIGHT trial of TAS-102 in combination with bevacizumab for patients with R/R mCRC; FDA approval of this regimen and current role in clinical practice
  • Mechanism of action of fruquintinib; similarities and differences among other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors
  • Available data from the Phase III FRESCO-2 study of fruquintinib for patients with mCRC who have experienced disease progression on or are intolerant to approved standard therapies
  • Recent FDA approval of fruquintinib and optimal incorporation into current management algorithms
  • Biological rationale for and early clinical activity observed with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody-based therapies for microsatellite-stable (MSS) mCRC
  • Pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic similarities and differences between botensilimab and currently available anti-CTLA-4 antibodies; implications for activity and tolerability
  • Available efficacy and safety with and ongoing investigation of botensilimab/balstilimab for patients with MSS mCRC resistant to chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy
  • Clinical activity and safety observed with cabozantinib in combination with anti-PD-1/ PD-L1 antibodies among patients with MSS mCRC in early-phase trials; similarities and differences between cabozantinib and zanzalintinib
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy and safety endpoints for the Phase III STELLAR-303 trial evaluating zanzalintinib in combination with atezolizumab versus regorafenib for patients with MSS/mismatch-repair proficient mCRC who have progressed after or are intolerant to standard therapy
  • Other promising novel agents and strategies for patients with CRC

11:10 AM – 12:00 PM — Pancreatic Cancer
Selection and Sequencing of Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PAD)

  • Significance of patient age, comorbidities and prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy in the choice of first-line treatment for metastatic PAD
  • Historical data sets establishing the efficacy and safety of FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine/nab paclitaxel for patients with previously untreated advanced PAD
  • Proposed mechanism of the improved delivery of cytotoxic therapy to pancreatic cancer cells with nanoliposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI) compared to conventional chemotherapy
  • Design, eligibility criteria and primary and secondary endpoints of the Phase III NAPOLI-3 trial evaluating nal-IRI, 5-FU/leucovorin and oxaliplatin (NALIRIFOX) versus gemcitabine/nab paclitaxel for previously untreated metastatic PAD
  • Overall survival, progression-free survival and other key efficacy outcomes reported from the NAPOLI-3 trial
  • Tolerability profile of NALIRIFOX compared to that of gemcitabine/nab paclitaxel in the NAPOLI-3 trial
  • Potential clinical role of up-front NALIRIFOX for metastatic PAD
  • Optimal selection and sequencing of available therapies for relapsed metastatic PAD
  • Published research experience with and practical integration of nal-IRI for relapsed metastatic PAD

Biomarker-Based Strategies for Metastatic PAD; Novel Investigational Approaches

  • Incidence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other DNA damage response abnormalities in patients with PAD; guideline-endorsed algorithms for genetic testing
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key endpoints of the Phase III POLO trial evaluating olaparib as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy for patients with metastatic PAD and a germline BRCA mutation
  • Long-term efficacy and safety findings from the POLO trial
  • Optimal integration of up-front maintenance olaparib for patients with BRCA-mutated metastatic PAD
  • Ongoing research attempting to further establish the role of PARP inhibitors in therapy for PAD
  • Incidence of KRAS G12C mutations in PAD; available research findings with and ongoing evaluation of sotorasib and adagrasib for patients with heavily pretreated KRAS G12C-mutated disease
  • Other clinically relevant (eg, NTRK, BRAF) and potentially actionable (eg, KRAS G12D, claudin 18.2, NRG1) therapeutic targets in patients with PAD
  • Biological rationale for and available data with tumor treating fields (TTFields) for patients with newly diagnosed inoperable PAD
  • Design, eligibility criteria and key efficacy and safety endpoints of the Phase III PANOVA-3 trial evaluating TTFields in combination with gemcitabine/nab paclitaxel; potential role for this strategy
  • Other promising investigational treatment strategies for advanced PAD

12:00 PM — ADJOURN

Target Audience
This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to

  • Effectively apply results of practice-changing clinical research to the care of patients with breast, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynecologic, lung and select hematologic cancers.
  • Appraise the clinical relevance of recent pivotal cancer research published in peer-reviewed journals or presented at major oncology conferences.
  • Recall ongoing trials of therapies for select hematologic cancers and solid tumors, and appropriately refer patients for study participation.
  • Use an understanding of tumor biomarkers and single and multigene signatures to individualize the care of patients with cancer.
  • Educate patients with diverse hematologic cancers and solid tumors about the benefits and risks of new therapeutic agents and strategies.
  • Apply an awareness of new data sets and the perspectives of tumor-specific clinical investigators to refine or validate current treatment algorithms.
  • Evaluate the mechanisms of action, tolerability and efficacy of promising investigational agents, and consider the implications for clinical practice.

CME Accreditation Statement
Research To Practice is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CME Credit Designation Statement
Research To Practice designates this live activity for a maximum of 14.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

A CME credit link will be given to each participant as part of the meeting course materials.

ACPE Accreditation Statement
The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy Continuing Education provided the ACPE accreditation for this course. The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

ACPE Credit Designation Statement
This activity is approved for up to 0.145 CEU (14.5 contact hours) of continuing education credit. To receive 14.5 contact hours of CE credit, the participant must attend each session and complete the online evaluation. Upon successfully completing the course evaluation, the continuing pharmacy education credits will automatically be uploaded to CPE Monitor (allow 3 to 4 weeks for processing).

An ACPE credit link will be given to each participant as part of the meeting course materials.

NCPD Accreditation Statement
Research To Practice is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation (ANCC).

NCPD Credit Designation Statement
This educational activity for 14.5 contact hours is provided by Research To Practice.

This activity is awarded 14.5 ANCC pharmacotherapeutic contact hours.

ONCC/ILNA Certification
This program will be submitted for ONCC/ILNA certification.

NCPD Credit Form
To obtain a certificate of completion and receive credit for this event, nurses must attend the entire activity and return a completed Educational Assessment and Credit Form. A credit form link will be given to each participant as part of the meeting course materials.

American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) — Maintenance of Certification (MOC)
Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component and a post-test, enables the participant to earn up to 14.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Please note, this program has been specifically designed for the following ABIM specialties: medical oncology and hematology.

Privacy Policy
Personal information and data sharing: Research To Practice aggregates deidentified user data for program-use analysis, program development, activity planning and site improvement. We may provide aggregate and deidentified data to third parties, including commercial supporters. We do not share or sell personally identifiable information to any unaffiliated third parties or commercial supporters. Please see our privacy policy at ResearchToPractice.com/Privacy-Policy for more information. For those clinicians wishing to receive ABIM MOC credit for attending, you will receive an email after the event with instructions.

Content Validation and Disclosures
Research To Practice (RTP) is committed to providing its participants with high-quality, unbiased and state-of-the-art education. Any individuals in a position to control the content of a CME/NCPD-accredited continuing education activity, including faculty, planners, reviewers and others, are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with ineligible entities (commercial interests). All relevant conflicts of interest will have been mitigated prior to the commencement of this activity. In addition, all activity content is reviewed by RTP scientific staff and an external, independent reviewer for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies referenced and patient care recommendations.

FACULTY — The following faculty reported relevant financial relationships with ineligible entities:

Dr Abou-AlfaConsulting Agreements: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Autem Therapeutics, Berry Genomics, BioNTech SE, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Incyte Corporation, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Merck, Merus BV, Neogene Therapeutics, Novartis, Servier Pharmaceuticals LLC, Tempus, Vector Pharma, Yiviva; Contracted Research: Agenus Inc, Arcus Biosciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, BioNTech SE, Bristol Myers Squibb, Digestive Care Inc, Elicio Therapeutics, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Helsinn Healthcare SA, Puma Biotechnology Inc, QED Therapeutics, Yiviva; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr AntonarakisAdvisory Committees: Aadi Bioscience, Amgen Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Curium, Janssen Biotech Inc, Merck, Pfizer Inc, Sanofi, Tango Therapeutics, Tempus; Consulting Agreements: EcoR1 Capital LLC, HOOKIPA Pharma Inc, Lilly, Menarini Silicon Biosystems, Z-Alpha; Contracted Research: Astellas, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Clovis Oncology, MacroGenics Inc, Merck, Novartis, Orion Corporation, Seagen Inc; Patent Holder: QIAGEN. Dr Callander — No relevant conflicts of interest to disclose. Dr CiomborAdvisory Committees: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Exelixis Inc, Incyte Corporation, Loxo Oncology Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Company, Merck, Personalis, Pfizer Inc, Replimune, Seagen Inc; Consulting Agreements: Merck, Pfizer Inc; Contracted Research: Array BioPharma Inc, a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb, Calithera Biosciences, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Incyte Corporation, Merck, NuCana, Pfizer Inc, Seagen Inc. Dr Dagogo-JackConsulting Agreements: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BostonGene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Foundation Medicine, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Merus BV, Novocure Inc, Pfizer Inc, Roche Laboratories Inc, Sanofi, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc; Contracted Research: Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Novartis, Pfizer Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: Vivace Therapeutics, Inc. Dr FinnConsulting Agreements: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, CStone Pharmaceuticals, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Hengrui Therapeutics Inc, Lilly, Merck, Pfizer Inc; Contracted Research: Bristol Myers Squibb, Eisai Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Merck, Pfizer Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; Speakers Bureau: Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. Dr GalskyConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, Alligator Bioscience, Analog Devices Inc, Asieris Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Basilea Pharmaceutica Ltd, Bicycle Therapeutics, Bristol Myers Squibb, Curis Inc, Dragonfly Therapeutics, EMD Serono Inc, FUJIFILM Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, GSK, Janssen Biotech Inc, Merck, Numab Therapeutics AG, Rappta Therapeutics, Pfizer Inc, Seagen Inc, Silverback Therapeutics, UroGen Pharma; Contracted Research: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Dendreon Pharmaceuticals Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Merck, Novartis. Dr GaronAdvisory Committees: AbbVie Inc, Arcus Biosciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Atreca, Bristol Myers Squibb, EMD Serono Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, GSK, HOOKIPA Pharma Inc, LianBio, Lilly, Merck, Merus BV, Novartis, Personalis, QED Therapeutics, a BridgeBio company, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Sanofi, Seagen Inc, Sensei Biotherapeutics, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Oncology Inc, Summit Therapeutics, Synthekine, Xilio Therapeutics, Zymeworks Inc; Contracted Research: ABL Bio, ArriVent Biopharma, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, EMD Serono Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Iovance Biotherapeutics, Lilly, Merck, Mirati Therapeutics Inc, Novartis, Prelude Therapeutics, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Synthekine; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: Nuvalent; Sponsored Independent Medical Education: Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc; Travel: A2 Bio, Novartis. Dr HamiltonConsulting Agreements — Payment Made to Institution: Accutar Biotechnology Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Ellipses Pharma, Entos Pharmaceuticals, Fosun Pharma, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Greenwich LifeSciences Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lilly, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, MphaR, Novartis, Olema Oncology, Orum Therapeutics, Pfizer Inc, Stemline Therapeutics Inc, Theratechnologies, Tubulis, Zentalis Pharmaceuticals; Contracted Research — Payment Made to Institution: AbbVie Inc, Accutar Biotechnology Inc, Acerta Pharma — A member of the AstraZeneca Group, ADC Therapeutics, Akesobio Australia Pty Ltd, Amgen Inc, Aravive Inc, ArQule Inc, Artios, Arvinas, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, AtlasMedx Inc, BeiGene Ltd, Black Diamond Therapeutics Inc, Bliss Biopharmaceutical, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Clovis Oncology, Compugen, Context Therapeutics, Cullinan Oncology, Curis Inc, CytomX Therapeutics, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Dantari, Deciphera Pharmaceuticals Inc, Duality Biologics, eFFECTOR Therapeutics Inc, Ellipses Pharma, Elucida Oncology Inc, EMD Serono Inc, FUJIFILM Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, G1 Therapeutics Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, H3 Biomedicine, Harpoon Therapeutics, Hutchison MediPharma, ImmunoGen Inc, Incyte Corporation, Infinity Pharmaceuticals Inc, Inspirna, InventisBio, Jacobio Pharmaceuticals Group Co Ltd, Karyopharm Therapeutics, K-Group Beta, Kind Pharmaceuticals LLC, Leap Therapeutics Inc, Lilly, Loxo Oncology Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Company, Lycera, MacroGenics Inc, Marker Therapeutics Inc, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Merus BV, Molecular Templates, Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc, Novartis, NuCana, Olema Oncology, OncoMed Pharmaceuticals Inc, Onconova Therapeutics Inc, Oncothyreon, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, Orinove Inc, Orum Therapeutics, Pfizer Inc, PharmaMar, Pieris Pharmaceuticals Inc, Pionyr Immunotherapeutics, Plexxikon Inc, Prelude Therapeutics, ProfoundBio, Radius Health Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Relay Therapeutics, Repertoire Immune Medicines, Seagen Inc, Sermonix Pharmaceuticals, Shattuck Labs, Stemcentrx, Sutro Biopharma, Syndax Pharmaceuticals Inc, Syros Pharmaceuticals Inc, Taiho Oncology Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, Tesaro, A GSK Company, Tolmar, Transcenta, Treadwell Therapeutics, Verastem Inc, Zenith Epigenetics, Zymeworks Inc; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: Verascity Science. Dr JanjigianAdvisory Committees and Consulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, Amerisource Bergen, Arcus Biosciences, AskGene Pharma, Astellas, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Basilea Pharmaceutica Ltd, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Geneos Therapeutics, GSK, Guardant Health, Imugene, Inspirna, Lilly, Lynx Health LLC, Merck, Merck Serono, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Pfizer Inc, Seagen Inc, Silverback Therapeutics, Zymeworks Inc; Contracted Research: Arcus Biosciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Inspirna, Lilly, Merck, Transcenta; Data and Safety Monitoring Boards/Committees: Arcus Biosciences, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Transcenta; Stock Options — Private Company: Inspirna; Nonrelevant Financial Relationships: Clinical Care Options, Cycle for Survival, Fred's Team, HMP Education, Imedex, MJH Life Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Paradigm Medical Communications, PeerView Institute, US Department of Defense. Dr JonaschConsulting Agreements: Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, GSK, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Merck, Nikang Therapeutics Inc, Novartis, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited; Contracted Research: Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Corvus Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Nikang Therapeutics Inc, Novartis, Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: Pfizer Inc. Dr KaklamaniConsulting Agreements: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, Lilly, Menarini Group, Puma Biotechnology Inc, TerSera Therapeutics LLC; Contracted Research: Eisai Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: Sanofi; Speakers Bureaus: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Novartis, Pfizer Inc, Seagen Inc. Dr KalinskyAdvisory Committees: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Menarini Silicon Biosystems, Merck, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Myovant Sciences, Puma Biotechnology Inc, Seagen Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc; Consulting Agreement: Merck; Contracted Research: Ambrx, Ascentage Pharma, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Gilead Sciences Inc, Novartis; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: ADC Therapeutics (spouse). Dr KlempnerAdvisory Committees: Amgen Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Coherus BioSciences, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Merck, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Natera Inc, Pfizer Inc, Sanofi, Servier Pharmaceuticals LLC; Consulting Agreements: Astellas, Novartis; Medical Advisory Boards (No Compensation): Debbie’s Dream Foundation, Hope for Stomach Cancer; Stock Options/Ownership — Public Companies: Nuvalent (ended 11/2022), Turning Point Therapeutics Inc (ended 6/2022); Nonrelevant Financial Relationships: American Gastroenterological Association, Degregorio Family Foundation, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health, Stand Up 2 Cancer/AACR. Dr KoAdvisory Committees (One-Time Advisory Boards): Aadi Bioscience, Arcus Biosciences, Eisai Inc, FibroGen Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Merus BV; Consulting Agreement: FibroGen Inc; Contracted Research (to Institution): AbGenomics, Apexigen, Astellas, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Leap Therapeutics Inc, Merck, Verastem Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Boards/Committees: Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Grail Inc; Nonrelevant Financial Relationships: Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr LaCasceAdvisory Committees: Kite, A Gilead Company, Seagen Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee (Does Not Take Payment): Bristol Myers Squibb. Dr LangerConsulting Fees: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, GSK, Heat Biologics, Merck, Mirati Therapeutics Inc, Novocure Inc, Pfizer Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Sanofi, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc; Data Safety Monitoring Boards or Advisory Boards (Co-Chair): Amgen Inc, Oncocyte; Medical Writing: Novartis; Research Funding: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lilly, Merck, Oncocyte, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, Trizell; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: US Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr LunningConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Caribou Biosciences Inc, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Fate Therapeutics, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Genmab US Inc, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, Kite, A Gilead Company, Loxo Oncology Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Company, Nurix Therapeutics Inc, Recordati, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Seagen Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc; Research Support: Bristol Myers Squibb, Fate Therapeutics, Sana Biotechnology. Dr MaddocksConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, ADC Therapeutics, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Genmab US Inc, Incyte Corporation, Janssen Biotech Inc, Kite, A Gilead Company, Lilly, MorphoSys. Dr McKayConsulting Agreements: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Bristol Myers Squibb, Calithera Biosciences, Caris Life Sciences, Dendreon Pharmaceuticals Inc, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceuticals, Lilly, Merck, Myovant Sciences, Novartis, Pfizer Inc, Sanofi, Seagen Inc, Sorrento Therapeutics, Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited, Tempus; Contracted Research: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, ArteraAI, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Exelixis Inc, Oncternal Therapeutics. Dr MonkConsulting Agreements: Acrivon Therapeutics, Adaptimmune, Agenus Inc, Akeso Biopharma Co Ltd, Amgen Inc, Aravive Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Clovis Oncology, Eisai Inc, Elevar Therapeutics, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Genmab US Inc, Gradalis Inc, Hengrui Therapeutics Inc, ImmunoGen Inc, Iovance Biotherapeutics, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Laekna Therapeutics, Merck, Merck KGaA, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc, Novartis, Novocure Inc, OncoC4, Panavance Therapeutics, Pfizer Inc, Pieris Pharmaceuticals Inc, Puma Biotechnology Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Seagen Inc, Sorrento Therapeutics, Tesaro, A GSK Company, VBL Therapeutics, Verastem Inc, Zentalis Pharmaceuticals; Speakers Bureaus: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Clovis Oncology, Eisai Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, ImmunoGen Inc, Merck, Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc, Tesaro, A GSK Company; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: US Oncology Research. Dr O'MalleyAdvisory Committees and Consulting Agreements (Personal Fees): AbbVie Inc, Adaptimmune, Agenus Inc, Arcus Biosciences, Arquer Diagnostics, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Atossa Therapeutics, Cardiff Oncology, Celcuity, Clovis Oncology, Corcept Therapeutics, Duality Biologics, Eisai Inc, Elevar Therapeutics, Exelixis Inc, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Genelux Corporation, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, GSK, ImmunoGen Inc, Imvax Inc, InterVenn Biosciences, InxMed, Iovance Biotherapeutics, Janssen Biotech Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Laekna Therapeutics, Leap Therapeutics Inc, Luzsana Biotechnology, Merck, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, MSD, Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc, Novartis, Novocure Inc, OncoC4, Onconova Therapeutics Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Replimune, Roche Diagnostics, R-Pharm US, Seagen Inc, Sorrento Therapeutics, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Oncology Inc, Sutro Biopharma, Tarveda Therapeutics, Toray Industries Inc, Trillium Therapeutics Inc, Umoja Biopharma, VBL Therapeutics, Verastem Inc, Vincerx Pharma, Xencor, Zentalis Pharmaceuticals; Contracted Research (Institution Received Funds): AbbVie Inc, Advaxis Inc, Agenus Inc, Alkermes, Aravive Inc, Arcus Biosciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, BeiGene Ltd, Bristol Myers Squibb, Clovis Oncology, Deciphera Pharmaceuticals Inc, Eisai Inc, EMD Serono Inc, Exelixis Inc, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Genmab US Inc, GSK, ImmunoGen Inc, Incyte Corporation, Iovance Biotherapeutics, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Leap Therapeutics Inc, Merck, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, MSD, Novartis, Novocure Inc, OncoC4, OncoQuest Inc, Pfizer Inc, Predictive Oncology Inc, Prelude Therapeutics, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Rubius Therapeutics, Seagen Inc, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Oncology Inc, Sutro Biopharma, Tesaro, A GSK Company, Verastem Inc; Nonrelevant Financial Relationships: GOG Foundation Inc, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd, National Cancer Institute, NRG Oncology, RTOG, SWOG. Dr O'ReillyConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Autem Therapeutics, Berry Genomics, BioNTech SE, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Incyte Corporation, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, J-Pharma Co Ltd, Merck, Merus BV, Neogene Therapeutics, Novartis, Servier Pharmaceuticals LLC, Tempus, Vector Pharma, Yiviva; Contracted Research: Agenus Inc, Arcus Biosciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, BioNTech SE, Bristol Myers Squibb, Digestive Care Inc, Elicio Therapeutics, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Helsinn Healthcare SA, Puma Biotechnology Inc, QED Therapeutics, Yiviva; Nonrelevant Financial Relationship: Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr O'ShaughnessyAdvisory Committees and Consulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, Agendia Inc, Aptitude Health, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Carrick Therapeutics, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Eisai Inc, Fishawack Health, G1 Therapeutics Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, GSK, Lilly, Loxo Oncology Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Company, Merck, Novartis, Ontada, Pfizer Inc, Pierre Fabre, Puma Biotechnology Inc, Roche Laboratories Inc, Samsung Bioepis, Sanofi, Seagen Inc, Stemline Therapeutics Inc. Dr RichardsonAdvisory Committees: Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, GSK, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Oncopeptides, Sanofi; Research Grants: Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Oncopeptides, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. Dr RiniAdvisory Committee: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; Consulting Agreements: Alkermes, Aravive Inc, Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Athenex, Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Corvus Pharmaceuticals, Debiopharm, Eisai Inc, EUSA Pharma, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, HiberCell, Merck, NiKang Therapeutics Inc, Pfizer Inc, Sanofi, Surface Oncology; Contracted Research: ADC Therapeutics, Adela, Arcus Biosciences, Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Dracen Pharmaceuticals, Dragonfly Therapeutics, Exelixis Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, HiberCell, Incyte Corporation, Janssen Biotech Inc, Merck, Pfizer Inc, Pionyr Immunotherapeutics, POINT Biopharma, Strata Oncology, Surface Oncology, Tempus, VasGene Therapeutics Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP. Dr RosenbergAdvisory Committee: Astellas, Seagen Inc, Tyra Biosciences; Consulting Agreements: Aadi Bioscience, Alligator Bioscience, Astellas, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb, EMD Serono Inc, Emergence Therapeutics, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Imvax Inc, Infinity Pharmaceuticals Inc, Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine Co Ltd, Lilly, Merck, Mirati Therapeutics Inc, Pfizer Inc, QED Therapeutics, Seagen Inc, Tyra Biosciences; Contracted Research: Astellas, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Seagen Inc; Speakers Bureaus: EMD Serono Inc, Pfizer Inc; Nonrelevant Financial Relationships: Clinical Care Options, Medscape, MJH Life Sciences. Dr RugoConsultancy/Advisory: Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Napo Pharmaceuticals Inc, Puma Biotechnology Inc, Viatris; Contracted Research: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Lilly, Merck, Novartis, OBI Pharma Inc, Pfizer Inc, Pionyr Immunotherapeutics, Sermonix Pharmaceuticals, Stemline Therapeutics Inc. Dr StricklerAdvisory Committees: AbbVie Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BeiGene Ltd, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, GSK, Janssen Biotech Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lilly, Merck, Natera Inc, Pfizer Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, Seagen Inc, Taiho Oncology Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, Xilio Therapeutics; Contracted Research: AbbVie Inc, Amgen Inc, AStar D3, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BeiGene Ltd, Curegenix, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Erasca, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, GSK, Leap Therapeutics Inc, Lilly, Seagen Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Boards/Committees: BeiGene Ltd, Seagen Inc; Stock Options — Private Company: Triumvira Immunologics. Dr YuConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Black Diamond Therapeutics Inc, Blueprint Medicines, C4 Therapeutics, Cullinan Oncology, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, Taiho Oncology Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee: Janssen Biotech Inc; Research Funding to My Institution: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Black Diamond Therapeutics Inc, Blueprint Medicines, Cullinan Oncology, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Erasca, Janssen Biotech Inc, Novartis, Pfizer Inc. Dr ZelenetzConsulting Agreements: AbbVie Inc, Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation, Amgen Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Celgene Corporation, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Gilead Sciences Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, MEI Pharma Inc, MorphoSys, Novartis; Contracted Research: BeiGene Ltd, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, MEI Pharma Inc; Data and Safety Monitoring Boards/Committees: BeiGene Ltd (DMC chair), Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Juno Therapeutics, a Celgene Company.

MODERATORDr Love is president and CEO of Research To Practice. Research To Practice receives funds in the form of educational grants to develop CME activities from the following companies: AbbVie Inc, Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation, ADC Therapeutics, Agios Pharmaceuticals Inc, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Amgen Inc, Array BioPharma Inc, a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc, Astellas, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BeiGene Ltd, BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals Inc, Blueprint Medicines, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Clovis Oncology, Coherus BioSciences, CTI Biopharma, a Sobi company, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Eisai Inc, Elevation Oncology Inc, EMD Serono Inc, Epizyme Inc, Exact Sciences Corporation, Exelixis Inc, Five Prime Therapeutics Inc, Foundation Medicine, G1 Therapeutics Inc, Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, Genmab US Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, Grail Inc, GSK, Halozyme Inc, Helsinn Healthcare SA, ImmunoGen Inc, Incyte Corporation, Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Kite, A Gilead Company, Kronos Bio Inc, Legend Biotech, Lilly, Loxo Oncology Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly & Company, MEI Pharma Inc, Merck, Mersana Therapeutics Inc, Mirati Therapeutics Inc, Mural Oncology Inc, Natera Inc, Novartis, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation on behalf of Advanced Accelerator Applications, Novocure Inc, Oncopeptides, Pfizer Inc, Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company, Puma Biotechnology Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, R-Pharm US, Sanofi, Seagen Inc, Servier Pharmaceuticals LLC, SpringWorks Therapeutics Inc, Stemline Therapeutics Inc, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Oncology Inc, Taiho Oncology Inc, Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc, TerSera Therapeutics LLC, Tesaro, A GSK Company, TG Therapeutics Inc, Turning Point Therapeutics Inc, Verastem Inc, and Zymeworks Inc.

UNLABELED/UNAPPROVED USES NOTICE
There is no implied or real endorsement of any product by Research To Practice, the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education or American Nurses Credentialing Center. Any off-label use as declared by the FDA will be identified.

RESEARCH TO PRACTICE CME/NCPD PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS, STAFF AND REVIEWERS
Planners, scientific staff and independent reviewers for Research To Practice have no relevant conflicts of interest to disclose.

Supporters
This activity is supported by educational grants from AbbVie Inc, ADC Therapeutics, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, BeiGene Ltd, Bristol Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Genmab US Inc and AbbVie Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Legend Biotech, Lilly, Merck, Natera Inc, and Stemline Therapeutics Inc.

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King Ballroom (Conference Level)

Room Reservations
A special discounted room rate of $399 per night and discounted resort fee of $50 per guest, per night plus applicable taxes are available to conference attendees at the JW Marriott Miami Turnberry. Instructions on how to secure hotel accommodations will be included in the confirmation email you will receive after completing your registration for this event.

Please mention you are participating in the Third Annual Miami General Medical Oncology Symposium to receive the special group rate.

Room reservations must be made by Thursday, February 29th, 2024. A limited number of rooms are available, and we encourage you to make your reservations early. After Thursday, February 29th, 2024, the hotel will offer the best rates based on room availability.

Parking
Discounted parking will be available for 2024 GMO Conference attendees as follows: A charge of $25.00 plus tax per car, per night applies for valet parking. A charge of $20.00 plus tax per car, per night applies for self-parking. Guests are permitted unlimited in-and-out privileges for both self and valet parking. Daily parking is $10.00 plus tax per car for 0 to 3 hours, $12.50 plus tax per car for 3 to 6 hours and $22.50 plus tax per car for 6 hours or more. Prices are subject to change. Please note that unfortunately, due to regulatory reporting requirements, Research To Practice is unable to validate parking. 

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals.

In-Person Registration Fees
This event is free of charge for practicing physicians, fellows, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare providers involved in the treatment of cancer.

For all other individuals, including industry professionals,* a conference registration fee of $1,000 is available through February 24, 2024 and then $1,250 after that day. All fees processed will be nonrefundable after February 9, 2024 (5:00 PM eastern time). To cancel your registration, please contact our Meeting Services department at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com or call (800) 233-6153.

* Individuals employed by for-profit organizations, including financial institutions and biotech or pharmaceutical companies.

IN-PERSON Registration for clinicians in practice/healthcare professionals

I am a practicing physician, fellow, pharmacists, nurse or other healthcare provider involved in the treatment of cancer.

IN-PERSON Registration
for clinicians »
IN-PERSON Registration for other/industry professionals*

At this time, due to seating capacity, in-person registration is limited to clinicians in practice only. If you would like to be notified should seats become available, please add your name to our Stand By list.

All other individuals are welcome to join the program virtually with the Zoom registration option below.

STAND BY Registration
for nonclinicians »
* Individuals employed by for-profit organizations, including financial institutions, biotech or pharmaceutical companies
LIVE WEBCAST Complimentary Registration for all professionals

Please note we will stream this event over Zoom. After registering you will receive a separate confirmation from Zoom with the viewing instructions.

REGISTRATION FOR WEBCAST »
Registration for groups
If you are registering a group (more than 1 person) for this event, please contact us at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com or (800) 233-6153.
To ensure seating and meal service, please check in at our onsite registration desk at least 30 minutes before the start of the meeting. We cannot guarantee seating after the start of the program.

Photography and/or video recording may be taken during the educational program by Research To Practice and used in future educational offerings.

Research To Practice fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA. If you are in need of assistance (ie, physical, dietary, et cetera), please contact us prior to the event at (800) 233-6153.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us via email at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com, or call (800) 233-6153.